SHAZAM Community
Ask Your Question

Revision history [back]

For maximum performance SHAZAM stores all data and performs all calculations within a contiguous static memory array and efficiently manages its own memory. The maximum size of the static memory array is set using the PAR statement and the maximum that can be allocated depends on the operating system SHAZAM is running on. If the PAR is too small, SHAZAM will tell you what it needs to be depending on what sort of estimation is being done.

On Windows the maximum memory array that can be allocated is limited by the amount of virtual memory (RAM plus paging file) on the computer.

On a 32bit Windows Operating system a process can theoretically allocate a maximum of 2GB without the ‘large address space aware’ flag set in its executable image. However our tests show that the maximum single memory array that Windows will ACTUALLY allow is around 1.4 Gigabytes whether or not that flag is set. Looking around the internet, this seems to be a fairly common boundary within other software such as the Java Virtual Machine, .NET runtime etc

The good news is that the 1.4GB limit is more than sufficient to handle the amount of data you are talking about - many times over. If you would like us to demonstrate this with your dataset please email us and we can work out a way to test it for you.

On a 64bit Windows Operating system this limit disappears into the many Terabyte range - a limit we still haven't found yet (although it is probably around 8 Terabytes). However, only the 64bit version of the forthcoming SHAZAM 11 will be able to utilise that - a free upgrade for new purchases of SHAZAM 10 at present.

click to hide/show revision 2
Clarification of a few points

SHAZAM easily has the capacity to analyse a dataset of these dimensions.

For maximum performance SHAZAM stores all data and performs all calculations within a contiguous static memory array and efficiently manages its own memory. The maximum size of the static memory array is set using the PAR statement and the maximum that can be allocated depends on the operating system SHAZAM is running on. Users don't ordinarily have to adjust the PAR value however you will need to change it for the amount of data you are using.

If the PAR value is too small, SHAZAM will tell you what it needs to be depending on what sort of estimation is being done.done. So typically a user will run their SHAZAM estimation with their data, SHAZAM will first size up the scale of the problem and tell the user how much memory they need if the PAR setting is too small.

On Windows the maximum size of the static memory array that can be allocated is limited by the amount of virtual memory (RAM plus paging file) on the computer.

On a 32bit Windows Operating system a process System a software program can theoretically allocate a maximum of 2GB to a single object (such as a memory array) without the ‘large address space aware’ flag set in its executable image. However However, our tests show that the maximum single memory array that 32bit Windows will ACTUALLY allow is appears to be around 1.4 Gigabytes whether or not that flag is set. Looking around the internet, this seems to be a fairly common boundary within that other software such as the Java Virtual Machine, .NET runtime etc

The good news is that the 1.4GB limit etc come up against.

SHAZAM is more than sufficient to handle capable of handling the amount of data you are talking about - many times over. If you would like us to demonstrate this with your dataset please email us help@econometrics.com and we can work out a way to test it with your dataset for you.

On a 64bit Windows Operating system this limit disappears System the maximum allocatable memory array is probably well into the many Terabyte range - a limit we still haven't found yet (although it is probably around 8 Terabytes). However, only the 64bit version of the forthcoming SHAZAM 11 will be able to utilise that - but this is a free upgrade for new purchases purchasers of SHAZAM 10 at present.

SHAZAM easily has the capacity to analyse a dataset of these dimensions.

For maximum performance SHAZAM stores all data and performs all calculations within a contiguous static memory array and efficiently manages its own memory. The maximum size of the static memory array is set using the PAR statement and the maximum that can be allocated depends on the operating system SHAZAM is running on. Users don't ordinarily have to adjust the PAR value however you will need to change it for the amount of data you are using.

If the PAR value is too small, SHAZAM will tell you what it needs to be depending on what sort of estimation is being done. So typically a user will run their SHAZAM estimation with their data, SHAZAM will first size up the scale of the problem and tell the user how much memory they need what the value of PAR should be if the PAR setting is too small.

On Windows the maximum size of the static memory array that can be allocated is limited by the amount of virtual memory (RAM plus paging file) on the computer.

On a 32bit Windows Operating System a software program can theoretically allocate a maximum of 2GB 2 Gigabytes to a single object (such as a the SHAZAM static memory array) without the ‘large address space aware’ flag set in its executable image. However, our tests show that the maximum single memory array that a 32bit Windows operating system will ACTUALLY allow appears to be around 1.4 Gigabytes whether or not that flag is set. Looking around the internet, this seems to be a fairly common boundary that other software such as the Java Virtual Machine, .NET runtime etc come up against.

SHAZAM is more than capable of handling the amount of data you are talking about - many times over. If you would like us to demonstrate this with your dataset please email help@econometrics.com and we can work out a way to test it with your dataset for you.

On a 64bit Windows Operating System the maximum allocatable memory array is probably well into the Terabyte range - a limit we still haven't found yet (although it is probably around 8 Terabytes). However, only the 64bit version of the forthcoming SHAZAM version 11 will be is able to utilise that but this allocate that much memory. SHAZAM version 11 is a free upgrade for new purchasers of SHAZAM version 10 at present.

SHAZAM easily has the capacity to analyse is more than capable of analysing a dataset of these dimensions.

For maximum performance SHAZAM stores all data and performs all calculations within a contiguous static memory array and efficiently manages its own memory. this array. The maximum size of the static memory array is set using the PAR statement and the maximum that can be allocated depends on the operating system SHAZAM is running on. Users don't ordinarily have to adjust the PAR value however you will need to change it for the amount of data you are using.

If the PAR value is too small, SHAZAM will tell you what it needs to be depending on what sort of estimation is being done. So typically a user will run their SHAZAM estimation with their data, SHAZAM will first size up the scale of the problem and tell the user what the value of PAR should be if the PAR setting is too small.

On Windows the maximum size of the static memory array that can be allocated is limited by the amount of virtual memory (RAM plus paging file) on the computer.

On a 32bit 32 bit Windows Operating System a software program can theoretically allocate a maximum of 2 Gigabytes to a single object (such as the SHAZAM static memory array) without the ‘large address space aware’ flag set in its executable image. However, our tests show that the maximum single memory array that a 32bit 32 bit Windows operating system will ACTUALLY actually allow appears to be around 1.4 Gigabytes whether or not that flag is set. Looking around the internet, this seems to be a fairly common boundary that other software such as the Java Virtual Machine, .NET runtime etc also come up against.

SHAZAM is more than capable of handling the amount of data you are talking about - many times over. If you would like us to demonstrate this with your dataset please email help@econometrics.com and we can work out a way to test it with your dataset for you.dataset.

On a 64bit 64 bit Windows Operating System the maximum allocatable memory array is well into the Terabyte range - a limit we still haven't found yet (although it is probably around 8 Terabytes). However, only the 64bit version of the forthcoming SHAZAM version 11 is able to allocate that much memory. Currently SHAZAM version 11 is a free upgrade for new purchasers of SHAZAM version 10 at present.

10.

SHAZAM is more than capable of analysing a dataset of these dimensions.

For maximum performance SHAZAM stores all data and performs all calculations within a contiguous static memory array and efficiently manages this array. The maximum size of the static memory array is set using the PAR statement and the maximum that can be allocated depends on the operating system SHAZAM is running on. Users don't The value of PAR ordinarily does not have to adjust the PAR value be adjusted however you will need to change it for the amount of data you are using.

If the PAR value is too small, SHAZAM will tell you what it needs to be depending on what sort of estimation is being done. So typically performed. Typically a user will run their SHAZAM estimation with their data, data and SHAZAM will first size up the scale of the estimation problem and tell the user what the value of PAR should be if the should the existing PAR setting is be too small.

On Windows the maximum size of the static memory array that can be allocated is limited by the amount of virtual memory (RAM plus paging file) on the computer.

On a 32 bit Windows Operating System a software program can theoretically allocate a maximum of 2 Gigabytes to a single object (such as the SHAZAM static memory array) without the ‘large address space aware’ flag set in its executable image. However, our tests show that the maximum single memory array that a 32 bit Windows operating system will actually typically allow appears to be around 1.4 Gigabytes whether or not that flag is set. Looking around the internet, this seems to be a fairly common boundary that other software such as the Java Virtual Machine, .NET runtime etc also come up against.

If you would like us to demonstrate this with please email help@econometrics.com and we can work out a way to test it with your dataset.

On a 64 bit Windows Operating System the maximum allocatable memory array is well into the Terabyte range - a limit we still haven't found yet (although it is probably around appears to be 8 Terabytes). Terabytes. However, only the 64bit version of the forthcoming SHAZAM version 11 is able to allocate that much memory. Currently SHAZAM version 11 is a free upgrade for new purchasers of SHAZAM version 10.

SHAZAM is more than capable of analysing a dataset of these dimensions.

For maximum performance SHAZAM stores all data and performs all calculations within a contiguous static memory array and efficiently manages this array. The maximum size of the static memory array is set can be changed using the PAR statement and the maximum that can be allocated PAR value depends on the operating system SHAZAM is running on.

The value of PAR ordinarily does not have to be adjusted adjusted, however you will need to change it for the amount of data you are using.

If the PAR value is too small, SHAZAM will tell you what it needs to be depending on what sort of estimation is being performed. Typically a user will run their SHAZAM estimation with their data and SHAZAM will first size up the scale of the estimation problem and tell the user what the value of PAR should be should if the existing PAR setting be is too small.

On Windows the maximum size of the static memory array that can be allocated is limited by the amount of virtual memory (RAM plus paging file) on the computer.

On a 32 bit Windows Operating System a software program can theoretically allocate a maximum of 2 Gigabytes to a single object (such as the SHAZAM static memory array) without the ‘large address space aware’ flag set in its executable image. However, our tests show that the maximum single memory array that a 32 bit Windows operating system will typically allow appears to be around 1.4 Gigabytes whether or not that flag is set.

On a 64 bit Windows Operating System the maximum allocatable memory array appears to be 8 Terabytes. However, only the 64bit version of the forthcoming SHAZAM version 11 is able to allocate that much memory. Currently SHAZAM version 11 is a free upgrade for new purchasers of SHAZAM version 10.